Divided Lites


What are Divided Lites?

Definition of Divided Lites in Construction
The separation of glass by what is referenced as mutin bars also commonly referred to as grills. These mutin bars can be artificial and installed within the space between the insulated glass, which is called simulated divided lite, or the glass itself can be separated by real pieces of wood or synthetic material, forming a true divided lite. To simulate a divided lite assembly, the use of removable grills is also a popular method. This presents the appearance of a divided lite, without the cost, and the ability to clean the glass is easily accommodated by removing the grill from the actual window sash. Colonial design normally consisted of true divided lite panels, due to the inability to manufacture larger pieces of glass, in one consistent and clear unit. This inability was due to lack of a technology that allowed the actual development of larger pieces of continuous glass. This lack of ability to produce the larger sheets of glass required that large openings be glazed with several separate pieces of glass, attached together with wood mutins, grillage, etc. It is ironic that modern construction and design is trying to recreate the look of a divided lite, even though technology has advanced to allow continuous large pieces of clear glass. In some architectural designs the use of divided lites on just one of the two sashes is used. In most cases, the upper sash has divided lites and the lower sash, to allow better vision through the glass, is kept clear and open. Divided lites are even used on interior pieces of fixed glass to provide an architectural appearance. A current and trendy method of displaying photos, is to use an old sash, made up of several panes of divided glass and mount photos in each of the panes. This technique is also commonly used for a mirror presentation within the home.